THE ASSOCIATION OF
CARIBBEAN-AMERICANS
IN CORRECTION(ACAC)

FAMOUS  CARIBBEAN-AMERICANS
ALEXANDER HAMILTON WAS BORN IN NEVIS AND
MIGRATED TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1772. HE WAS
ONE OF THE FOUNDING FATHERS OF THE U.S.A. AND
WAS APPOINTED THE FIRST SECRETARY OF THE
TREASURY IN 1780
SIDNEY POITER IS A BAHAMIAM-AMERICAN ACTOR,
FILM DIRECTOR, AND DIPLOMAT. HE WAS THE FIRST
BLACK MAN TO WIN AN ACADEMY AWARD FOR
BEST ACTOR FOR HIS ROLE IN "LILIES OF THE
FIELD".
HARRY BELAFONTE; HAILED "KING OF CALYPSO" IS
A JAMAICAN-AMERICAN MUSICIAN, ACTOR AND
SOCIAL ACTIVIST. HE IS BEST KNOWN FOR SINGING
THE "BANANA BOAT SONG"
MALCOLM X. HE WAS A BLACK MUSLIM
MINISTER AND HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVIST.
HIS MOTHER WAS BORN IN GRENADA
RIHANNA - BARBADOS
CICELY TYSON: WEST INDIAN-AMERICAN  EMMY-AWARD
WINNER AND ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATED ACTRESS.
PARENTS  FROM NEVIS. BEST KNOW FOR HER
APPEARANCES IN "SOUNDER", "ROOTS", "DIARY OF A
MAD WOMAN", AND "MADEA'S FAMILY REUNION".
Federal Judge Constance Baker Motley was born on September 14, 1921 in New Haven, Connecticut, the ninth of 12 children born to parents who had emigrated from
the island of Nevis in the West Indies.  Her pioneering career as a civil rights lawyer, lawmaker and judge spanned six decades and was highlighted by numerous
historic achievements, including becoming the first African American woman accepted at Columbia Law School, the first African American woman elected to the New
York Senate, the first woman and the first black woman to hold the position of Manhattan Borough President, and the first African American woman appointed to serve
as a federal district judge.
Federal Judge Constance Baker Motley, who as a young lawyer represented Martin Luther King Jr. and played a pivotal role in the nation’s civil rights struggle, has
died. She was 84
.
STOKELY CARMAICAL, (aka Kwame Ture;
June 29, 1941 – November 15, 1998) was a
Trinidadian-American black activist active
in the 1960s American Civil Rights
Movement. He rose to prominence first as
a leader of the Student Nonviolent
Coordinating Committee (SNCC,
pronounced "snick") and later as the
"Honorary Prime Minister" of the Black
Panther Party. Initially an integrationist,
Carmichael later became affiliated with
black nationalist and Pan-Africanist
movements. He popularized the term
"Black Power".
Louis Farrakhan Muhammad, Sr. (born
Louis Eugene Wolcott; May 11, 1933  in
The Bronx, New York, the younger of
two sons of Sarah Mae Manning (16
January 1900 – 18 November 1988) and
Percival Clark, immigrants from the
Caribbean islands. His mother was born
in Saint Kitts and Nevis. His father was a
Jamaican native and worked as a taxicab
driver. After Louis' father died in 1936,
the Wolcott family moved to Boston,
Massachusetts, where they settled in
the West Indian neighborhood of the
Roxbury area.
ERIC HOLDER - BARBADOS:Eric Himpton York, to parents with roots in
Barbados. Holder's father was born in Saint Joseph, Barbados and his
mother was born in New Jersey, while his maternal grandparents
were immigrants from Saint Philip, Barbados. Holder grew up in East
Elmhurst, Queens, and attended public school until the age of 10. In
1969, he graduated from Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan and
attended Columbia University, where he played freshman basketball
and was co-captain of his team. He earned an A.B. degree in American
history in 1973. Holder received his Juris Doctor from Columbia Law
School, graduating in 1976. He worked for the NAACP Legal Defense
and Educational Fund during his first summer and the United States
Attorney during his second summer
MARCUS GARVEY born in Jamaica,
Marcus Garvey was an orator for the
Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism
movements, to which end he founded
the Universal Negro Improvement
Association and African Communities
League. Garvey advanced a Pan-African
philosophy which inspired a global mass
movement, known as Garveyism.
Garveyism would eventually inspire
others, from the Nation of Islam to the
Rastafari movement
.
COLIN POWELL - JAMAICA: Colin Luther Powell was born on April 5, 1937[6] in
Harlem, a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, to Jamaican
immigrant parents Powell was raised in the South Bronx and attended Morris High
School, a former public school in the Bronx, from which he graduated in 1954. While
at school, he worked at a local baby furniture store where he picked up Yiddish from
the shopkeepers and some of the customers. He received his Bachelor of Science
degree in geology from the City self-admitted C average student. He was later able
to earn a Master of Business Administration degree from the George Washington
University in 1971, after his second tour in Vietnam
PRINCE HALL: Prince Hall (c.1735– December 7, 1807), was an African American noted as a
tireless abolitionist, for his leadership in the free black community in Boston, and as the
founder of Prince Hall Masonry. Prince Hall was born in Barbados to a European father and
an African-European mother who fled to the Hall became a Methodist minister.  Black
Freemasonry scholars have for the most part, rejected Grimshaw’s account due to
inconsistencies. Hall European father and an African-Freemasonry, education and the
military, which were some of the most crucial spheres of society in his time. Hall is
considered the founder of “Black Freemasonry” in the United States, known today as
Prince Hall Freemasonry. Hall formed the African Grand Lodge of North America. Prince
Hall was unanimously elected its Grand Master and served until his death in 1807. He also
lobbied tirelessly for education rights for black children and a back-to-Africa movement.
Many historians regard Prince Hall as one of the more prominent African-American leaders
throughout the early period of the United States.
DAVID PATERSON- JAMAICA/GRENADA:David Paterson was born in
Brooklyn to Portia Paterson, a homemaker, and labor law
attorney Basil Paterson. Basil Paterson was later a New York
state senator and secretary of state, and served as deputy
mayor of New York City. Paterson traces his roots on his
mother's side of the family to pre-Civil War African American
slaves in the states of North Carolina and South Carolina.[8] His
father is half Afro-Jamaican. His paternal grandmother,
Evangeline Rondon Paterson was secretary to Black Nationalist
leader Marcus Garvey. His paternal grandfather was Leonard
James Paterson,ma native of St. George's, Grenada.
TOUSSAINT - HAITi : Born François Dominique Toussaint
Bréda, Toussaint Louverture was the preeminent figure
of the Haitian Revolution. A former slave, he became a
brilliant general and capable administrator, defeating
British, Spanish, and French troops, emancipating the
slave population, and overseeing the country's initial
attempts at reforming its political and social structure.
His extraordinary efforts at reaching across lines of race
and class set him apart from his contemporaries, and his
vision of a race-blind, independent country of equals
was ahead of his time. As skilled as he was on the
battlefield, Toussaint was equally at ease manipulating
the machinery of politics and diplomacy. Wise,
intelligent, tireless, ascetic, pragmatic, opportunistic,
fond of aesthetic pleasures, the man many called "Papa
Toussaint" grew up taking care of plants and animals,
and the theme of Toussaint as "father" or "caretaker"
runs throughout his life story
ALICIA KEYS - FATHER  JAMAICAN,
MOTHER IRISH-ITALIAN
PATRICK EWING
Patrick Aloysius Ewing, Sr. (born August
5, 1962) is a Jamaican-American retired
most of his career with the NBA's New
York Knicks as their starting center.
Ewing was named as the 16th greatest
college player of all time by ESPN. He
won Olympic Gold Medals as a member
of the 1984 and 1992 US Men's National
Basketball teams. In a 1996 poll
celebrating the 50th anniversary of the
NBA, Ewing was selected as one of the
50 Greatest Basketball Players of All
Time. On April 7, 2008 he was elected to
the Basketball Hall of Fame in
Springfield, Massachusetts. He was
inducted into the Hall of Fame on
September 5, 2008 along with former NBA
coach Pat Riley and former Houston
Rockets center Hakeem Olajuwon. His
number 33 was retired by the Knicks in
2003
TIMOTHY THEODORE"TIM" DUNCAN - ST. CROIX
(VIRGIN ISLAND)  4 TIME NBA CHAMPION, 2 TIME NBA
MVP, 3 TIME NBA FINALS MVP, AND NBA ROOKIE OF
THE YEAR.

BOB ROBERT LESTER MARLEY
CLAUDE MCKAYWAS A JAMAICAN
AMERICAN WRITER AND POET. HE WAS A
RENAISSANCE. HE WROTE THREE
NOVELS: HOME TO HARLEM(1928) WHICH
WAS A BEST SELLER AND WON THE
HARMON GOLD AWARD FOR LITERATURE
Du Sable was born in approximately 1745 Saint Dominique,
in the region now known as the country of Haiti. His
mother was African and a former slave. His father was a
French mariner of some success, who took Du Sable to
France for his education. There, the boy acquired a taste
for fine art and culture, as well as languages. In addition
to his native French, he learned English and Spanish, and
assembled an impressive collection of valuable works of
art.
TATYANA MARISOL ALI:  ACTRESS,
MODEL, CHILD PERFORMER ON SESAME
STREE STARTING IN 1985. SHE WAS CAST
AS ASHLEY BANKS IN THE SITCOM "THE
FRESH PRINCE OF BELAIR". HER FATHER
IS OF TRINIDAD-INDIAN DESCENT
CARLA CAMPBELL BORN 1981 IN JAMAICA
IMG IN NEW YORK. SHE RECEIVED HER
MOST WIDESPREAD EXPOSURE
APPEARING IN THE 2006 SPORTS
ILLUSTRATED SWIMSUIT ISSUE, BEING THE
FIRST MODEL FROM THE CARIBBEAN TO
APPEAR IN THE HIGHLY POPULAR
MAGAZINE AND SHE IS ALSO THE SECOND
MODEL FROM THE CARIBBEAN TO SHOOT
FOR VICTORIA'S SECRET
SHIRLEY CHISHOLM: Shirley Anita St. Hill was born in Brooklyn, New
York, of immigrant parents. Her father was born in British Guiana and
Her mother, Ruby Seale, was born in Christ Church, Barbados, At age
three, Chisholm was sent to Barbados to live with her maternal
grandmother, where she attended the Vauxhall Primary School. She
did not return until roughly seven years later. In her 1970
autobiography Unbought and Unbossed, she wrote: "Years later I
would know what an important gift my parents had given me by
seeing to it that I had my early education in the strict, traditional,
British-style schools of Barbados. If I speak and write easily now, that
early education is the main reason."
The first player from this island nation
of Jamaica was Chili Davis, when he
started with the San Francisco Giants
in 1981. Since Davis, there have been
three other players born in Jamaica,
Devon White, Rolando Roomes and
Justin Masterson, who is currently a
pitcher for the Cleveland Indians.
Reggie Fils-Aime was born to Haitian immigrants, who moved
to the United States due to the conflicting political was born in
the Bronx and graduated from Brentwood High School on Long
Island and was accepted to Cornell University in 1979. While at
Cornell, he was president of the school's Phi Sigma Kappa
fraternity chapter. He earned a Bachelor of Science in applied
economics in 1983.
Reginald "Reggie" Fils-Aime is President and chief operating
officer of Nintendo of America, the North American division of
the Japan-based video game company Nintendo.[2][3] Prior to
his promotion to President and Chief Operating Officer,
Fils-Aime was Executive Vice President of Sales and
Marketing. He gained celebrity status among gamers following
his appearance at Nintendo's May 2004 E3 press conference.
Charles Andre Dorismond better known by
his stage name Bigga Haitian, is a
Haitian-American entertainer who rose to
fame in the 1990s. He is known as "the first
Haitian singer to break into the Jamaican
reggae scene", tearing down national and
cultural walls and paving the way for the next
generation of Haitian artists. Today's most
talented Haitian artists, such as Wyclef Jean
and Mecca aka Grimo, credit Bigga as an
influence
Onika Tanya Maraj (born December 8, 1982[1] or December 8, known by her stage name
Nicki Minaj ( /mɪˈnɑːʒ/), is a Trinidadian-born American rapper, singer, songwriter, voice
actress and television personality. She was born in Saint James, Trinidad and Tobago.
When she was five years old, she moved to the New York City borough of Queens. Minaj
released three mixtapes between 2007 and 2009 and signed to Young Money
Entertainment.
GRANDMASTER FLASH: Joseph Saddler (born January 1, 1958 in Bridgetown, Barbados),
better known as King Grandmaster Flash, is an American hip hop musician and DJ—one
of the pioneers of hip-hop DJing, cutting, and mixing.

He has been credited with the invention of the first crossfader by sourcing parts from a
junkyard in the Bronx. It was initially an On/Off toggle switch from an old microphone that
he transformed into a left/right switch which allowed him to switch from one turntable to
another, thereby avoiding a break in the music.

Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame in 2007, becoming the first hip hop/rap artists to be so honored.
Cuba Gooding, Sr. (born April 27, 1944) is the lead singer of the soul
group The Main Ingredient, most notable for its two biggest hits,
"Everybody Plays the Fool" (1972) and "Just Don't Want to Be Lonely"
(1974). Gooding also had a brief solo career on Motown Records during
the late-1970s and early-1980s.
Born in New York City, New York, Gooding is a son of Dudley MacDonald
Gooding and his wife Addie Alston. The elder Gooding was a native of
Barbados who fled the island in 1936 to Cuba, and met and married a
woman there. When she was murdered because of their affiliation with
Pan Africanist leader Marcus Garvey, Dudley Gooding promised his wife
on her deathbed that he would name his first son Cuba. His father died
when Cuba was eleven years old.


Black History Month: Dr Velma Scantlebury-White Dr Velma Scantlebury-White is the United States’ first African American female transplant surgeon.
BY SANDRA SEALEY | SAT, FEBRUARY 08, 2014 - 11:35 AM

Dr Velma Scantlebury-White, the United States’ first African American female transplant surgeon and associate director of the Kidney Transplant Programme in Delaware at
Christiana Care Health System, has performed more than 800 transplants in children and adults.

But what is also significant is that this famous surgeon is a Barbadian.

Born in Goodland, St Michael, she spent three years at Alleyne School in St Andrew, before migrating to New York in 1969 with her parents who moved the family to New York City
because they wanted better opportunities for their children.

She completed her high school education at the Prospect Heights High School at Classon Avenue in Brooklyn, New York. She went on to Long Island University in 1973 to read
for a bachelor's degree in biology, graduating in 1977 and moving to Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. She earned her medical degree from Columbia
University, followed by an internship and residency in general surgery at Harlem Hospital Centre in New York.

She completed her fellowship training in transplantation surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Centre, and continued her career in transplantation under the leadership
of Dr Thomas Starzl from 1988 to 2002.

In 1989, Scantlebury became an assistant professor and later an associate professor at the University of Pittsburgh and in 2002, she was recruited from the University of
Pittsburgh, one of the top transplant centres in the world, to the University of South Alabama. While at the University of South Alabama, Scantlebury was appointed professor of
surgery and director of the University of South Alabama's Gulf Coast Regional Transplant Centre.

Throughout her exceptional career, she has performed more than 200 living donor transplants and more than 500 deceased donor kidney transplants in children and adults,
according to USA Medicine.

“My passion is to educate the African-American community and to empower dialysis patients with the knowledge and understanding that they too can have a better life through
the gift of transplantation," Dr Scantlebury-White told EBONY Magazine in a March 2006 article.

An active educator in the field of African-American organ donation, she has served on the board for the American Society of Minority Health and Transplant Professionals and as a
spokesperson for Linkages to Life, an organization that encourages African-Americans to become organ donors.  She continues to mentor young students and residents, and
encourages them to “reach for the stars” and follow their dreams.

Dr Scantlebury-White is married to Dr Harvey White and is the mother of two daughters, Akela and Aisha.